Posts Tagged diet

Check out my response and that of other RDNs order at EatThis.com.

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Check out responses from several RDNs including me on EatThis.com.

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Think 'processed' means bad for you? Processed foods can help you meet your food group quotas and nutrient needs. Check out nine processed foods that I and other RD experts recommend on EatThis.com.

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Can you eat just one cookie? I know I can. This is something I taught myself to do. It wasn't easy at first, but once I gave myself permission to eat what I like and really taste and savor it, it made it that much easier to stop at just one.

Eat this, Not That asked me to weigh in on this question. Check out my response here.

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According to the latest Stress in America Survey conducted annually by the America Psychological Association, average stress levels have decreased since 2007. Despite this downward trend, many Americans say they continue to struggle to achieve their healthy living goals and that stress adversely affects their eating and sleeping habits.

The survey also finds that money is a tremendous cause of stress in America. Nearly one third of adults report that their finances or lack of money prevent them from living a healthy lifestyle.

Among women, those who have high stress related to money are more likely to report sedentary or unhealthy behaviors than women with low stress about money. Compared with women with low money-related stress, those with high money-related stress report watching television/movies for more than two hours per day (55 percent vs. 38 percent), surfing the Internet (57 percent vs. 34 percent), napping/sleeping (41 percent vs. 23 percent), eating (40 percent vs. 19 percent), drinking alcohol (21 percent vs. 9 percent) or smoking (19 percent vs. 7 percent).

Women who say their stress about money is high also are significantly more likely than women who say they have low stress about money to rate their health as fair or poor (34 percent vs. 13 percent).

Among all adults, about one third report eating too much or eating unhealthy foods over the last month in response to stress.

Can you relate to any or all of the above?

Stress is an inevitable part of all our lives. Finding ways to cope with stress in a healthful way is essential to preserve both health and sanity. Easier said than done, I know, but critical if you want to look and feel your best and optimize your overall health.

While there’s no one size fits all approach to managing stress, my book, Younger Next Week (Harlequin Nonfiction) is a tool you can use to move towards more balance in your life, especially in the face of stress. The book has an anti-aging twist, but really it’s about promoting vitality and managing stress among women. (Even some men have said that the book has helped them establish more healthful food and fitness habits).

In the book, I describe several ways stress affects our habits—e.g. it makes us overeat, eat late at night, over-caffeinate, or even drink too much alcohol); then I provide solutions including Stressipes® (remedies to help you overcome the negative effects stress has on your food, fitness, and lifestyle behaviors).

Younger Next Week also includes a Vitality Plan complete with food lists, easy-to-follow menus, and delicious recipes created by Robyn Webb. The book has been honored with three awards (Winner, 2014 USA Best Book Award, and two National Health Information Awards of Merit) and I hope it will help you and the women in your life learn to nurture and care for yourselves, especially in the face or wake of stress, and to not just survive it but thrive in spite of it.

To learn more about Younger Next Week, click here.

For more on stress management, check out some great resources by the American Psychological Association here.

How do you handle stress in a positive and productive way?

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Since 2015 is here, I thought I’d put together a list of some great ideas to help you help your kids eat better during the upcoming year.

Don’t worry—I’m not suggesting any kind of complete dietary overhaul. But I do recommend all of these no-fuss strategies suggested by some top dietitians to help move kids’ diets and habits in a more healthful direction. Read more here on Parents.com.

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Check out this list from Greatist.

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Here's a segment on new menu labeling on CBS.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just released final menu labeling rules. But will they help kids eat better? My latest Scoop on Food post for Parents Magazine.

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Do you feel like stress or simply the back-to-school-or-back-to-fall rigors are sapping your vitality? Learn how to use food, fitness and other tools to reclaim what should be yours, no matter how busy or stressful life gets.

On Thursday, September 18th, I'll share my secrets for vitality at the 92nd Street Y. In my talk, I'll cover some of the principles outlined in my new book, Younger Next Week, and share some new research and info to help you age better in body and mind and look and feel your very best.

For tickets and information about The Vitality Plan: Embracing the Anti-Aging Power of Food, click here.  And to see six Stressipes®, click here.

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