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Since 2015 is here, I thought I’d put together a list of some great ideas to help you help your kids eat better during the upcoming year.

Don’t worry—I’m not suggesting any kind of complete dietary overhaul. But I do recommend all of these no-fuss strategies suggested by some top dietitians to help move kids’ diets and habits in a more healthful direction. Read more here on Parents.com.

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I’ll admit it. I’ve been bingeing lately. Not on chocolate or cookies (not that there’s anything wrong with that, lol). But on books. Young adult books. Works of fiction. I can’t help myself.

In another installment of Books I Love on my Stressipes® blog, I thought I’d share my thoughts about a few recent reads. Warning: Most are about love and relationships, and other things that lend urgency and drama to childhood. I’m a sucker for it all. If you're not, stop right now. If you might be or are, read on.

While most of these titles are aimed at teens, I know each of them resonated with me. My guess is that they’ll appeal to people of all ages who enjoy realistic fiction with all the drama typical of adolescence.

So without further ado, here are seven titles I think are worth talking about. Some are new, while others have been around for a while. (No spoilers, I promise!)

1. Milkweed, by Jerry Spinelli. This was the first book I read during my current binge. Although it’s not considered a young adult book, I read it to my husband husband over the course of a few drives last summer as our 12-year-old read it as part of his summer reading for school. Milkweed is about a little orphan boy who flies (mostly solo) through Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II the best way he knew how. The book simultaneously devastated me while filling my heart with love and hope. The book got under my skin, probably because I had family members who survived or were killed in the Holocaust. To this day, I think of the protagonist, Misha Pilsudsky. And my husband, son and I still bring him up in conversation from time to time. He inspires all of us. I loved the story so much but could not read the last page aloud without crying. Not just a drip or two, but a full out cry. It was that brilliant and moving.

Favorite lines: pages 207-208

“My daughter does not pester me with questions. She knows everything that I told her mother, which means everything but Janina. All those years of talking, all those street corners—I kept my sister to myself.

One time Katherine said to me, “Are you ever going to tell me why you named her Janina?”

“Someday,” I said.”

2. Eleanor and Park, by Rainbow Rowell. I hope that Rowell (who doesn’t know me, by the way) doesn't think I’m a stalker because I’m always posting tweets about her/this book. What can I say? A) I loved this book SO much, and B) We authors need to support one another (not that Rowell needs my help, lol). But back to the book: As a girl who grew up in suburbia the mid 1980’s, I could relate to Eleanor and Park in so many ways. The school bus. The mixtapes. the music. The neighborhood. I related especially to the story of young love and of falling in love. The characters are so beautifully written—I could see each of them in my mind. They are fully formed. And not just the main characters, but ALL of them including their parents and school friends (and enemies). I cannot wait to see this book on the big screen (thankfully, Rowell is writing the screenplay).

Favorite lines: pages 113 and 132

Eleanor: “Are you sure you want them to meet me?”

Park: “Yes,” he said. “I want everyone to meet you. You’re my favorite person of all time.”

--

“But Park’s face was like art. And not weird, ugly art either. Park had the sort of face you painted because you didn’t want history to forget it."

3. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green. I hadn’t even heard of this extremely successful author until I saw this movie last spring. I loved so much about the book including the unfolding of a love story between two teens (one struck with terminal cancer) and thoughtful discussions about the meaning of life e.g. is it better to be loved (but not really known) by many or deeply loved by a few? The unique story and endearing characters made this book so appealing to me. And it made me want to learn how to write in a way that also moves people. It really moved me. I hope to someday be in touch with him to personally thank him for inspiring me to carve a new professional path for myself!

Favorite lines: pages 31-32:

“I liked Augustus Waters. I really really really liked him. I liked the way his story ended with someone else. I liked his voice. I liked that he took existentially fraught free throws. I liked that he was a tenured professor in the Department of Slightly Crooked Smiles with a dual appointment in the Department of Having a Voice That Made My Skin Feel More Like Skin.”

4. I’ll Give You The Sun, by Jandy Nelson. I’m sure like Rowell, Nelson (who also does not know me) doesn't think I’m a stalker because I tweet to/about her so much. But I can’t help but share my love for this unbelievable book. I might otherwise burst! The book tells the story of Noah and Jude, twins, and the story unfolds going back and forth between Noah, at age 13, and Jude, at age 16. Everything about this book is EXTRAORDINARY and BRILLIANT. I can’t say enough about it. It’s like a gigantic poem with the most interesting and imaginative characters. Nelson does an unbelievable job allowing the reader to picture every movement in the main characters’ lives and every thought in their minds. The book lives on my bookshelf and I sometimes pick it up just to reread a few pages just because. It makes me feel a million different emotions all at once. The only real problem with the book is that it sets the bar SO high for all other YA books—or all other books, for that matter. It is simply BEYOND.

Favorite lines: pages 7 and 215

(told from Noah’s perspective): “Mom smiles at Jude and puts her hands on the table. I put mine on the table too, then realize I’m being a Mom-mirror and hide my hands in my lap. Mom’s contagious.”

--

(told from Jude’s perspective): “He’s looking at me in that way of his that should be illegal or patented and it’s affecting my ability to remember things like my name or my species and all the reasons a girl might go on a boy strike.”

5.     Anna and the French Kiss, by Stephanie Perkins. This book was delightful. I really loved the story about Anna, a 17-year-old who’s forced by her parents to spend her senior year of high school in Paris. Sounds ideal, I know, but Anna was not on board with leaving her school, her life, her friends, and her hot crush to go somewhere where she knew no one. That is until she falls for someone. I won’t give the story away, but I will say that I love Perkins’ writing style. It's rich, sweet and satisfying like a warm cup of hot chocolate with extra whipped cream.

Favorite lines: page 42

“I spend the rest of lunch in a stall. I miss home so much that it physically hurts. My head throbs, my stomach is nauseous, and it’s all so unfair. I never asked to be sent here. I had my own friends and my own inside jokes and my own stolen kisses. I wish my parents had offered me the choice: “Would you like to spend your senior year in Atlanta or Paris?”

Who knows, maybe I would have picked Paris.

What my parents never considered is that I just wanted a choice.”

6.     Isla and the Happily Ever After, by Stephanie Perkins. I finished this book today and loved it. It’s so engaging and so enjoyable, and I had trouble putting it down—especially after reading Anna and the French Kiss (see 5!) in which Isla and Josh, the main characters in this book, are introduced). Isla goes to private school in France and spends summers in New York City. When her crush who recently broke up with his girlfriend enters the picture, things change—sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. Perkins does a great job fleshing out each character and crafting an enticing and believable story. And the cameos by Josh’s friends (some of whom star in Anna and the French Kiss) are an amazing and welcome element in this story about love, romance, and possibilities.

Favorite lines, page 45

“I think he likes me. I don’t even know how that’s possible, but I do know that it doesn’t matter anymore. It can’t matter. In physics, I feel his stare—a string as delicate and gossamer as a spider’s web, gently tugging at the back of my skull. I imagine snipping it loose with a pair of sharp scizzors. I don’t know if he’ll try to talk to me after class, and I don’t know what I should say if he does.”

7. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, by Jenny Han. This book was very very sweet and I loved how unsent love letters to crushes are the story’s thread. Han writes in a best-friend kind of way that makes you want to continue on. She paints a vivid picture of The Song sisters and the love and complexity of such relationships. I never had a sister but I imagine Han’s portrayal of the Song sisters would resonate with many. Another reason I love the book? Josh...

Favorite lines: page 87

“Who’s the guy?”

“What guy?”

“The guy you’re dating?”

That’s when I see him. Peter Kavinsky, walking down the hallway. Like magic. Beautiful, dark-haired Peter. He deserves background music, he looks so good. “Peter. Kavinsky. Peter Kavinsky!” The bell rings, and I sail past Josh. “I’ve gotta go! Talk later, Josh!””

What are your favorite young adult books?

Thanks for indulging me! Coming soon: another 7 recent YA reads I've loved.

If you have a published young adult book and would like to share it with me for possible mention/review on my blog, please email me at elisa@elisazied.com.

About me: I'm a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of 4 nutrition books. I'm also a speaker, spokesperson, and freelance writer and have my own Parents.com blog called The Scoop on Food. Currently trying my hand at fiction, I'm writing my first young adult novel. Let's connect about all things nutrition, food, and books at @elisazied and @ezwriternyc on Twitter and at Elisa Zied on Facebook. I'm also on Instagram (Elisa Zied).

 

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Posted on December 15, 2014

I’ll admit it. I’ve been bingeing lately. Not on chocolate or cookies (not that there’s anything wrong with that, lol). But on books. Young adult books. Works of fiction. I can’t help myself. In another installment of Books I Love on my Stressipes® blog, I thought I’d share my thoughts about a few recent reads. Warning: Most are about love and relationships, and other things that lend urgency and drama to childhood. I’m a sucker for it all.

While most of these titles are aimed at teens, I know each of them resonated with me. My guess is that they’ll appeal to people of all ages who enjoy realistic fiction with all the drama typical of adolescence.

So without further ado, here are seven titles I think are worth talking about. Some are new, while others have been around for a while. (No spoilers, I promise!)

1. Milkweed, by Jerry Spinelli. This was the first book I read during my current binge. Although it’s not considered a young adult book, I read it to my husband husband over the course of a few drives last summer as our 12-year-old read it as part of his summer reading for school. Milkweed is about a little orphan boy who flies (mostly solo) through Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II the best way he knew how. The book simultaneously devastated me while filling my heart with love and hope. The book got under my skin, probably because I had family members who survived or were killed in the Holocaust. To this day, I think of the protagonist, Misha Pilsudsky. And my husband, son and I still bring him up in conversation from time to time. He inspires all of us. I loved the story so much but could not read the last page aloud without crying. Not just a drip or two, but a full out cry. It was that brilliant and moving.

Favorite lines: pages 207-208

“My daughter does not pester me with questions. She knows everything that I told her mother, which means everything but Janina. All those years of talking, all those street corners—I kept my sister to myself.

One time Katherine said to me, “Are you ever going to tell me why you named her Janina?”

“Someday,” I said.”

2. Eleanor and Park, by Rainbow Rowell. I hope that Rowell (who doesn’t know me, by the way) doesn't think I’m a stalker because I’m always posting tweets about her/this book. What can I say? A) I loved this book SO much, and B) We authors need to support one another (not that Rowell needs my help, lol). But back to the book: As a girl who grew up in suburbia the mid 1980’s, I could relate to many elements of the book. Especially to the story of young love and of falling in love. The characters are so beautifully written—I could see each of them in my mind. They are fully formed. And not just the main characters, but ALL of them including their parents and school friends (and enemies). I cannot wait to see this book on the big screen (thankfully, Rowell is writing the screenplay).

Favorite lines: pages 113 and 132

Eleanor: “Are you sure you want them to meet me?”

Park: “Yes,” he said. “I want everyone to meet you. You’re my favorite person of all time.”

--

“But Park’s face was like art. And not weird, ugly art either. Park had the sort of face you painted because you didn’t want history to forget it."

3. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green. I hadn’t even heard of this extremely successful author until I saw this movie last spring. I loved so much about the book including the unfolding of a love story between two teens (one struck with terminal cancer) and thoughtful discussions about the meaning of life e.g. is it better to be loved (but not really known) by many or deeply loved by a few? The unique story and endearing characters made this book so appealing to me. And it made me want to learn how to write in a way that also moves people. It really moved me. I hope to someday be in touch with him to personally thank him for inspiring me to carve a new professional path for myself!

Favorite lines: pages 31-32:

“I liked Augustus Waters. I really really really liked him. I liked the way his story ended with someone else. I liked his voice. I liked that he took existentially fraught free throws. I liked that he was a tenured professor in the Department of Slightly Crooked Smiles with a dual appointment in the Department of Having a Voice That Made My Skin Feel More Like Skin.”

4. I’ll Give You The Sun, by Jandy Nelson. I’m sure like Rowell, Nelson (who also does not know me) doesn't think I’m a stalker because I tweet to/about her so much. But I can’t help but share my love for this unbelievable book. I might otherwise burst! The book tells the story of Noah and Jude, twins, and the story unfolds going back and forth between Noah, at age 13, and Jude, at age 16. Everything about this book is EXTRAORDINARY and BRILLIANT. I can’t say enough about it. It’s like a gigantic poem with the most interesting and imaginative characters. Nelson does an unbelievable job allowing the reader to picture every movement in the main characters’ lives and every thought in their minds. The book lives on my bookshelf and I sometimes pick it up just to reread a few pages just because. It makes me feel a million different emotions all at once. The only real problem with the book is that it sets the bar SO high for all other YA books—or all other books, for that matter. It is simply BEYOND.

Favorite lines: pages 7 and 215

(told from Noah’s perspective): “Mom smiles at Jude and puts her hands on the table. I put mine on the table too, then realize I’m being a Mom-mirror and hide my hands in my lap. Mom’s contagious.”

--

(told from Jude’s perspective): “He’s looking at me in that way of his that should be illegal or patented and it’s affecting my ability to remember things like my name or my species and all the reasons a girl might go on a boy strike.”

5.     Anna and the French Kiss, by Stephanie Perkins. This book was delightful. I really loved the story about Anna, a 17-year-old who’s forced by her parents to spend her senior year of high school in Paris. Sounds ideal, I know, but Anna was not on board with leaving her school, her life, her friends, and her hot crush to go somewhere where she knew no one. That is until she falls for someone. I won’t give the story away, but I will say that I love Perkins’ writing style is rich, sweet and satisfying like a warm cup of hot chocolate with extra whipped cream.

 

Favorite lines: page 42

“I spend the rest of lunch in a stall. I miss home so much that it physically hurts. My head throbs, my stomach is nauseous, and it’s all so unfair. I never asked to be sent here. I had my own friends and my own inside jokes and my own stolen kisses. I wish my parents had offered me the choice: “Would you like to spend your senior year in Atlanta or Paris?”

Who knows, maybe I would have picked Paris.

What my parents never considered is that I just wanted a choice.”

 

  1. 6.     Isla and the Happily Ever After, by Stephanie Perkins. I finished this book today and loved it. It’s so engaging, so enjoyable, and I had trouble putting it down—especially after reading Anna and the French Kiss (another Perkins book that I finished last week in which Isla and Josh, the main characters in this book, are introduced). Isla goes to private school in France and spends summers in New York City. When her crush who recently broke up with his girlfriend enters the picture, things change—sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. Perkins does a great job fleshing out each character and unfolding the story. And the cameos by Josh’s friends (many of whom are main characters in Anna and the French Kiss) are an amazing and welcome element in this story about love, romance, and possibilities.

 

Favorite lines, page 45

“I think he likes me. I don’t even know how that’s possible, but I do know that it doesn’t matter anymore. It can’t matter. In physics, I feel his stare.—a string as delicate and gossamer as a spider’s web, gently tugging at the back of my skull. I imagine snipping it loose with a pair of sharp scizzors. I don’t know if he’ll try to talk to me after class, and I don’t know what I should say if he does.”

 

7. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, by Jenny Han. This book was very sweet and I loved how unsent love letters to crushes are the story’s thread. Han writes in a best-friend kind of way that makes you want to continue on. She painted a vivid picture of The Song sisters and the love and complexity of such relationships. I never had a sister but I imagine Han’s portrayal of the Song sisters would resonate with many. And then there’s Josh…

 

Favorite lines: page 87

“Who’s the guy?”

“What guy?”

“The guy you’re dating?”

That’s when I see him. Peter Kavinsky, walking down the hallway. Like magic. Beautiful, dark-haired Peter. He deserves background music, he looks so good. “Peter. Kavinsky. Peter Kavinsky!” The bell rings, and I sail past Josh. “I’ve gotta go! Talk later, Josh!””

What are your favorite young adult books?

Thanks for indulging me! Coming soon: another 7 titles of my recent YA reads.

If you have a published young adult book and would like to share it with me for possible mention/review on my blog, please email me at elisa@elisazied.com.

 

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I’m admittedly new to reading and (sort of) critiquing young adult fiction. Except for reading (and loving) the Hunger Games trilogy a few years ago, before any of the films came out, and skimming a few of my kids’ books to explain something or help with a school assignment, I had been spending most of my professional time reading and writing about food, fitness, and nutrition—a career I’ve enjoyed for 18 years. Recreational enjoyment of books was the best I could hope for or make time for.

After my mother’s illness last February (you can read all about it here in a post I wrote for U.S. News, Eat + Run –she’s fortunately doing really great now, knock on wood), I lost a little mojo to do what I had been doing and (mostly) really enjoying for almost two decades. (You can check out my BIO here). But after seeing The Fault in Our Stars (frankly, I had no idea who John Green was, nor did I know the movie was based on a bestselling young adult (YA) book), the clouds parted and a bright ray of sunshine came through. I knew I had to try to do something new, to try to do something to affect others in the same way that the movie had affected me. (A girl, or should I say a 45-year-old mother of two, can dream, can’t she?!) Could I try my hand at fiction? Perhaps write a young adult novel? Maybe a screenplay? I became inspired and decided I had to at least entertain the idea of following a new passion.

After reading John Green’s beautiful book, I search for other similar titles to read. I’ve also gone back to school, learning all I can about fiction and am currently working on my first YA novel. And I am SO excited! To add to my learning, I'm reading tons of YA books. Over the last few months, I’ve read more than a dozen of them and I'm fascinated by how different, unique, smart, funny, engrossing many of them are. I’ve chosen them from bestseller lists and recommendations from friends and readers of YA books. (I’m always happy to hear about books you or your teens have loved, so feel free to share your recommendations below if you wish.) I haven’t felt so emotionally invigorated in years, and have decided to share some of my favorite reads in my Stressipes® blog. Eleanor and Park is the first book I’ll cover, so without any spoilers, here goes.

The book is written by the uber talented and prolific Rainbow Rowell (doesn’t her name alone evoke sunshine and happiness?). It was, in a word, WONDERFUL. It starts during the summer of 1986, the time period in which I grew up, which made it extremely relatable, and tells the tale of two teens—Eleanor, described physically as big and awkward, with crazy, curly, bright red hair who was part of a poor, broken family, and Park, a cute, part Asian boy, described (eventually) by Eleanor as “the sun.” They unexpectedly find one another on the school bus, of all places, and learn a lot about themselves in the process during their often turbulent and always challenging teen years.

Anyone who has experienced or has yet to feel the bliss and angst of young and/or first love will likely find this beautifully written story extremely engaging. I know I did! Rowell intertwines her love of comic books and mixtapes to subtly propel and drive this sweet, satisfying, engrossing story that I didn’t want to put down. (I lost sleep for a few days reading it!) Recommended to me by a friend, Eleanor and Park AND Eleanor and Park have stayed with me and I plan to reread it next summer cover to cover because I miss it so much!

In his New York Times Book Review, John Green hit the nail on the head. He said, “Eleanor and Park reminded me just what it’s like to be young and in love with a girl, but also what it’s like to be young and in love with a book.” And I couldn’t agree more. It’s that good.

You can learn more about this book and her other work by checking out Rowell’s fantastic website (I enjoyed Fan Girl as well, and plan to read Landline soon). And if you have read Eleanor and Park, I'd love to hear your thoughts about it below.

Hope to connect on twitter (@elisazied and @ezwriternyc) and on Facebook or my Facebook fan page here.

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Do you feel like stress or simply the back-to-school-or-back-to-fall rigors are sapping your vitality? Learn how to use food, fitness and other tools to reclaim what should be yours, no matter how busy or stressful life gets.

On Thursday, September 18th, I'll share my secrets for vitality at the 92nd Street Y. In my talk, I'll cover some of the principles outlined in my new book, Younger Next Week, and share some new research and info to help you age better in body and mind and look and feel your very best.

For tickets and information about The Vitality Plan: Embracing the Anti-Aging Power of Food, click here.  And to see six Stressipes®, click here.

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Want to keep your hair looking its best, inject a little more laughter into your day, get motivated to move despite the obstacles or eat well and enjoyably? Check out my Spring into Summer Stressipes® EZine. Thanks to experts Ted Gibson, Heather Frey, Stone & Stone, Sally Kuzemchak and Toby Amidor for their excellent input.

You can sign up for my bi-monthly Stressipes® EZine on the home page of elisazied.com.

 

 

 

 

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Do you eat soy? Read all about it on Shape.com.

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This recently appeared on USNews.com's Eat + Run blog.

As an Eat + Run blogger, I’ve written about everything from sleep to fitness trackers and apps, from food and fitness trends to so much more. Today, I decided to get personal and share what recently happened to my mother, how it impacted me and how I got through it without falling apart.

Exactly five weeks and two days after my mother reveled in my glory at the launch of my latest book, "Younger Next Week," at our local Barnes & Noble, she developed a sudden and severe headache and passed out. My father, who was by her side, immediately called 911. In minutes, an ambulance took my mother to a local New York City hospital. And within the next few hours, my mother underwent – and survived – one surgery to relieve pressure in her brain and another to coil a brain aneurysm that had leaked. We later learned that half the people who go through what my mother went through don’t make it to the hospital. So I guess you’d say that she – and we – are truly blessed.

Of course, all this happened the night after my husband and I and our two sons landed in Utah for President’s Day weekend. Earlier that day, I had spoken with both my parents. In fact, my mother – being the Jewish mother that she is – warned me about avalanches. Now we joke that the real avalanche any of us needed to worry about was the one that would erupt in her head!

Although my father called me when my mother was at the hospital, we were out to dinner and I didn’t answer the phone. When we got back to the hotel, I fell asleep early, forgetting to check my phone (talk about Jewish guilt). Since my father had just gotten his very first iPhone and didn’t input my husband’s cell phone number or know the name of our hotel, he wasn’t able to reach me until early the next morning. When we finally spoke, my mother had just gone in for a second surgery. (I’ve since learned it was then the surgeon told my father that he might want to say his goodbyes. Instead, he simply said, “See you later, sweetie.”) Not wanting to end my boys’ vacation just when it was getting started, and knowing that it would be easier for me to fly home solo, my husband immediately bought me a plane ticket. After a quick breakfast together, I headed back home to be with my parents.

The author and her mother at a recent book signing.

My mom and I at my January 9, 2014 book signing.

Before my mom had the aneurysm (“BA,” as I like to call it), I was a wife, a mother of two, a daughter and a self-professed workaholic. As a registered dietitian nutritionist and the founder and president of my own nutrition communications company, Zied Health Communications, LLC, I – like many women – was a champion multitasker at work and in life. For years, I had written several books, blogs and presentations, did spokesperson work, shot videos and TV segments, and granted interviews for newspapers, magazines and websites, all while raising my sons. While I rarely took a full day off, I’ve always had a very flexible work schedule that has enabled me to spend a good amount of time with my children. Even if that meant working late at night, on weekends and on vacation, I always seemed to get a lot done on all fronts. Did I do it gracefully? Did I smell the roses? Probably not. But that’s because, for better or worse, my work – which I have always been so passionate about – defined me, at least in my own mind. To my surprise, when my mother fell ill (I call this period “AA” for “after the aneurysm”) – my all-important work suddenly wasn’t. Without hesitation, I immediately bowed out of several upcoming projects and told my editors that I needed to take a hiatus to be there for my parents. I also vowed that I would care for myself the best I could and without guilt, not only to preserve my own health and sanity but to be there in mind, body and spirit for my parents, husband and children.

Before any of this happened – and not long after my 40th birthday – I suffered from “post-traumatic 40 disorder.” While I’ve always embraced and enjoyed each of my birthdays, a few things threw me for a loop – a painful wrist injury that led to six months of physical therapy, surgery and then more physical therapy; the first of several breast biopsies (all benign); and the removal of a suspicious (but benign) mole from my back. While I was going through these personal challenges, several close friends struggled with health scares, job losses, marital troubles, deaths of family members and money problems. It all made me wonder: “How are we all going to get through these tough times without letting our health and well-being go to pot?”

Always one to care for myself, I eventually snapped out of my funk. When I did, I realized that no matter how good things may seem, for any of us the ceiling can crash down and life can change at any time. But no matter what, we owe it to ourselves and everyone around us to find a way not only to survive, but to learn from the challenges – and even thrive – in spite of them. So for the next two years, I would use my personal and professional experiences to create a roadmap to help women nurture themselves nutritionally, physically and emotionally, and to look and feel their very best no matter how stressful life becomes. That roadmap became "Younger Next Week."

While I’m extremely proud of my book and its messages, it wasn’t until now that it truly resonated with me. Little did I know while researching and writing the book that it would provide me with my own personal GPS to stay centered and relatively sane during my most challenging time yet.

I feel fortunate every day that I was and am still able to be there for my parents and the rest of my family. When this all began two months ago, I knew that I could financially afford to put my professional work aside. I’ve also had weekday household help (which includes cooking, cleaning, laundry and childcare when needed) for most of my boys’ lives. During this especially tough time, having help has truly been a gift that has enabled me to spend a lot of time with my mother without disrupting my family’s daily routines. But like anyone going through a crisis, I cried a lot (usually late at night or while showering) and had moments of utter exhaustion (like when I lost forever, without even realizing it, one of the earrings my husband gave me 10 years ago that I had worn every day since). Nutritionally, I didn’t always eat the way you think an expert like me would – sometimes, only chocolate, French fries or frozen yogurt topped with peanut butter cups, whipped cream and chocolate sauce would do for dinner or otherwise. And dare I say, after breaking up with Diet Coke two years ago, I went back to drinking one 20-ounce bottle a day, both for the caffeine and the comfort. Still, during this time, I did the best I could to care for myself even though I had what many would consider the perfect excuse to let my eating, fitness and lifestyle habits completely unravel.

I’ve shared below some of the ways I was able to cope during my mother’s five-week hospitalization and stint in rehab. I hope that if and when you’re confronted with similar challenges or circumstances, you too will feel empowered – and give yourself permission – to care for you. It’s vital!

I ate regularly. Even though lunch and dinner times varied daily, my usual routine of having breakfast with my kids stayed intact, mainly because my dad usually took the first shift (8 a.m. to noon) to care for my mother. Some of my favorite easy breakfasts included whole grain, high-fiber cereal, nonfat milk and banana; scrambled eggs with cheese and low fat chocolate milk; or Triscuits with cheddar cheese and grapefruit sections. For days when I was with my mother from noon to 5 p.m., I’d bring some snack foods (such as mixed unsalted nuts, granola bars, bananas and single-serve portions of peanut butter) to nosh on as well as bottle water. On days that I took the earlier and/or later shift, I’d have a more hearty lunch that I’d make at home or grab out with a friend followed by a light snack-like dinner (sometimes just a simple bowl of cereal). Lunches included things like a tuna salad or turkey and cheese sandwich on whole grain or seedless rye bread, smoked salmon and cream cheese on a scooped out whole wheat bagel, or a romaine salad with turkey, cheese, tomato and other vegetables). On those days, dinner might be any combination of a banana or apple slices with peanut butter or a few nuts, a low-fat chocolate milk, popcorn popped in canola oil, and/or a cup of cooked carrots or Brussels sprouts. As for treats, sometimes I’d have mini chocolate bars or Swedish fish (sold in the hospital gift shop), enjoy an occasional bag of Doritos, or have some ice cream. But I usually paired these high-calorie, nutrient-poor comfort foods with something nutritious (such as nuts or fruit), and I’d make sure to consume small portions.

I fit in fitness. Because I rely on exercise – especially power walking – to stay calm and carry on, preserve my bones and muscles, energize myself and manage stress, I knew it was vital for me to continue to move it – #moveitorloseit as I like to say – especially while I’d spend hours and hours each day hovering over my mother who mostly laid in a hospital bed. Always one to sport wedge heels, I immediately switched to flat boots – a fashion flip that enabled me to comfortably walk to and from the hospital (a 14-minute walk each way from my apartment) and to run errands or simply clear my mind without hurting my shins and calves. Score! I also walked on my treadmill, walked in the park when the weather permitted (sometimes with a friend) and walked long distances to run an errand or get a yogurt and clear my head. I also continued with my usual fitness routine that included lifting weights, working my core, doing leg exercises and hula hooping. I even did lunges and squats or danced to music I played in my mother’s room. I also took a few hip-hop dance classes with friends. In January, I signed up to walk at a comfortable walking pace my second More/Fitness Half Marathon – and my third half-marathon. Because I registered with a friend – fellow Eat + Run blogger Rebecca Scritchfield – I decided that as long as my mother was on the road to recovery by race day, I wouldn’t let Rebecca – or myself – down. On Sunday, April 13 – eight weeks after my mom landed in the hospital – Rebecca and I proudly crossed the finish line in less than 3.5 hours.

I stayed connected. When I headed to the airport after learning about my mother’s hospitalization, I took to Facebook. Without getting into details, I asked my friends to pray that her surgery (her second that morning) would be successful. Although I wasn’t up to talking about it in person or by phone for several days, I texted and emailed my nearest and dearest friends and family members to get support and to apprise them of what was happening. Not wanting to go it alone, having the support of others – even a simple text – really helped. As that first and very long week progressed, I began to accept some requests from friends to come to the hospital – even for just a few minutes – or to meet for a quick meal or a walk. I eventually made myself go for a manicure, have a nice dinner out or go to a ballgame, and do some other usual activities in-between hospital visits. Although I wanted to spend as much time as possible with my mother, and be there for my father as well, staying connected with the world, whether in person or via email, text and sometimes telephone, really helped me refresh and rejuvenate in-between hospital visits. At times, I did retreat and be by myself. But I knew that staying connected with others – but on my own terms (which sometimes meant not answering the phone or getting back to others right away) – was important. Allowing others to show their love and support also made me – and my family – feel like we weren’t alone. It also helped my mom recover.

I slept. Ever since I gave birth to my sons almost 16 and 12 years ago, sleep has been a very high priority. When one of my best friends picked me up from the hospital on day three of my mother’s 2.5 week stay in the ICU, I mentioned that my dad and I didn’t want to leave her side for even a minute but that we’d get next to no sleep there at night because of all the sounds and alarms in her room and in the unit. When my BFF suggested we look into getting an overnight aide, it was like a light bulb lit up! The next day, we contracted with the hospital nursing service to have an aide nightly from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. This was a godsend and allowed both my father and I to go home at night, decompress and get the sleep we desperately needed. This no doubt kept us feeling energized and on a more even keel so that we could help my mother as she recovered.

Very lucky to be alive, my mother is doing amazingly well. I continue to see her and spend time with her daily – how lucky we are to live across the street from one another! As she heals and gets accustomed to her "new normal," I continue to eat, move and live the best way I can and to manage my stress in mostly positive and productive ways. I’ve learned to slow down, smell the roses and be in the moment. And I’m back to blogging and will figure the rest out work-wise as I go along. Although my mother didn’t choose to have a significant brain bleed, I look at it as a gift for both of us. It allowed me to become the less selfish and more attentive daughter I always should have been. It showed me what remarkable people both my parents are. It also allowed me to put into real action and really practice the self-care that I preach in my new book and in all the work I do. I’m happy to say that, at least for me, I’m convinced there’s something to all of it.

Have you recently had a transformative life experience? How did you cope?

 

Elisa Zied, MS, RDN, CDN, is the founder and president of Zied Health Communications, LLC, based in New York City. She's an award-winning registered dietitian, nutritionist and author of the new book "Younger Next Week," along with three other books, including "Nutrition At Your Fingertips." A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and New York University, Zied inspires others to make more healthful food choices and find enjoyable ways to "move it or lose it" through writing, public speaking and media appearances. She writes the twice-weekly blog, The Scoop on Food, for Parents.com. You can connect with her on Twitter (@elisazied) and through her website www.elisazied.com.

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Forever-Young-banner2 (2)Aging is an inevitable part of life. I actually enjoy some of the perks of getting older—seeing my children grow and experience life, feeling more centered and getting more clarity about myself and life in general. But do we have to surrender to looking and feeling worse, physically and mentally, and having less energy, vim and vigor as the clock ticks? No we don’t!

To help you look and feel your very best, I’m thrilled to be one of more than 15 experts featured in the Forever Young Interview Series, hosted by wellness coach Karie Millspaugh. All the experts, including the fabulous Dr. Lori Shemek and fitness guru Joel Harper (who was recently featured in the Spring issue of my Stressipes® EZine) share years of research and experience to help you manage cravings, achieve and maintain a healthier body weight, fight disease, boost your sex appeal and more.

As a midlife woman, registered dietitian nutritionist and author of Younger Next Week—a stress-management, vitality-promoting, anti-aging book—speaker and spokesperson, you know I devote my professional life to helping women (and even men) find ways to eat better, get and stay fit and fight stress in healthy and sustainable ways. And I’m honored to have shared some of my secrets in this summit to help you live your very best life.

Starting on Monday, April 21st, 2014, you’ll have full access to my interview—and those of several incredible experts—to help you get on the road to true vitality.

I truly hope you’ll participate in this FREE and fantastic event. To register and learn more, click here. And please share the link with others who you think will enjoy this fabulous series. Thanks for your support!

Elisa Zied, MS, RDN, CDN is an award-winning registered dietitian nutritionist. The author of four books, including Younger Next Week, Elisa motivates and inspires others to destress, eat better and #moveitorloseit with her Stressipes®, articles, blogs, quotes, videos, talks and other appearances. She is frequently quoted in newspapers and magazines and has provided nutrition and lifestyle tips on Good Morning America, Today Show, The Early Show and on other TV shows. She is an advisor for Parents Magazine and writes The Scoop on Food for Parents.com. She also blogs for Shape.com and USNews.com. To learn how to live a more vibrant life, visit Elisa's website.

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Stress doesn't just impact parents; kids feel it too! Here's my new post for The Scoop on Food, Parents.com, to help you help kids stress less and take better care of themselves.

If you’ve ever allowed stress to make you reach for a cupcake, bowl of ice cream or jar of peanut butter—even when you weren’t hungry—you’re not alone. Several studies suggest that while not everyone eats in response to stress—in fact, some say they skip meals when stressed—it’s quite common to turn to food to cope. I know I have! Using food for comfort every once in a while certainly won’t derail an otherwise healthful diet. And sometimes, having that donut may just be what you need to settle down! But doing it often—especially if the foods we turn to are high in calories and easy to overdo—can set us up for unhealthy weight gain and its many consequences. And when our children see us use—or abuse—food to temper stress, it’s more likely they’ll model that behavior and suffer similar consequences....read more here.

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